Welcoming young children into your studio

Welcoming young children into your studio
Interested in widening your student base to include young children? Recent research points to enhanced brain development, increased musical potential, and even a higher occurrence of absolute pitch in students who begin lessons at an early age. In his essay "The Musical Brain," researcher Donald A. Hodges writes that "musical training changes the b...
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What are the most important rhythmic skills for the early-level student?

I remember the first time I heard Elvina Pearce talk about piano teaching. I was a doctoral candidate in piano performance and pedagogy at Northwestern University in the mid-1980s, and a special class of master's and doctoral students was assembled so that "Mrs. Pearce" could teach both at the same time. From the very start I was riveted by the pre...
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Boiling it down: Recipes for effective teaching

When I think back on the great teachers I have encountered in my life, I find that they all had one thing in common—the ability to boil things down to their essence. These teachers' abilities to reveal the essence of the subject matter made my understanding possible. Perhaps it was an applied teacher communicating the essentials of tone production,...
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A survey of current methods: The Robert Pace Keyboard Approach

his issue concludes Clavier Companion's survey of piano methods.1 Looking back over the past two years, I have come to realize that we are blessed with a tremendous variety of excellent, pedagogically sound materials. Several of my core beliefs have been confirmed: no one series is right for every teacher, or for all of any one teacher's stude...
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A survey of current methods: Succeeding at the Piano

This issue continues Clavier Companion's survey of piano methods.1 Each article in this series has three sections—an introductory synopsis by the Associate Editor, two articles written by teachers who have used the method extensively in their studios, and a response from the authors of the method surveyed in the previous issue. We hope that you fin...
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A survey of current methods: Music Moves for Piano

This issue continues Clavier Companion's survey of piano methods.1 Each article in this series has three sections—an introductory synopsis by the Associate Editor, two articles written by teachers who have used the method extensively in their studios, and a response from the authors of the method surveyed in the previous issue. We hope that you fin...
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A survey of current methods: Bastien Piano Basics

This issue continues Clavier Companion's survey of piano methods. Each article in this series has three sections—an introductory synopsis by the Associate Editor, two articles written by teachers who have used the method extensively in their studios, and a response from the authors of the method surveyed in the previous issue. We hope that you find...
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A survey of current methods: The Music Tree

This issue continues Clavier Companion's survey of piano methods.1 Each article in this series will have three sections-an introductory synopsis by the Associate Editor, two articles written by teachers who have used the method extensively in their studios, and a response from the authors of the method surveyed in the previous issue. We hope that y...
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How do you teach musicality?

We have all heard it from our beginning (and sometimes more advanced) students-that awful, wooden, unmusical playing. What can we do to fix it? If we tell them to crescendo to a certain note and then get softer, they stiffly climb up and down the dynamic ladder, and it sounds even less musical! Can musical playing be taught, or do some st...
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What is your plan for teaching a new piece? How does it vary for different levels of students?

Learning a new piece is like building a house. First there is a conception of the end result. The foundation is then laid - the more solid and stable, the better. Then the frame is erected and the most basic infrastructural elements are added. The skeleton then has more "flesh" progressively added until the process is nearly complete. The fini...
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Questions & Answers

Probably not all current subscribers can remember the original "Questions and Answers" column by Frances Clark, that ran in Clavier for 26 glorious years. It always appeared on the last page of the magazine and the editorial staff told us it was universally the favorite column in each issue. We heard, over and over, "I always turn to the back page ...
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How do you teach choreography to young students?

Subscribers to Keyboard Companion know the importance of a good beginning. And this month's Technique column offers some wonderful tools to help students get started with good technical habits. Marilyn Taggart has made an important contribution to the understanding of teaching piano technique. Her thorough study of physiology has given he...
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How Do You Teach Weight-Transfer to Early-Level Students?

from the series: Let's Get Physical: Technique Scott McBride Smith, Editor Who was it that said, "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach; those who can't teach, teach gym"? Not a piano teacher, obviously! And probably not a gym teacher, either. It's not necessary to be a world famous concert pianist to be a fine teacher, but it is essential...
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How Do You Teach Good Tone to Early-Level Students?

from the series: Let's Get Physical: Technique I met an old friend while writing my article for this issue of Keyboard Companion. It was great to renew communication after so many years apart - to hear his ideas and be reminded of his wisdom and his warmth. My friend? Robert Schumann. No, I'm not psychic. But I did feel close, again, to the co...
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Putting It All Together: Repertoire

Martha Appleby is an independent piano teacher who is known for her effective blend of expertise, good humor, and common sense. A weIl-traveled teacher, clinician, judge, and author, she has written Follow Me which is published by Neil A. Kjos Music ...
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Does Practice on a Digital Keyboard in the Early Years of Study Prevent a Student From Becoming a Good Pianist? Part II

In this issue, we continue with four more responses to the question first posed in the Spring 1995 issue regarding the use of digital keyboards for home practice. In keeping with the spirit of KEYBOARD COMPANION, we want to know your response to this question. I urge you to take the time to tell us your thoughts on this subject. We would especially...
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What Is Good Material to Use With Elementary Transfer Students Who Are Playing Music Far Too Difficult?

There are many reasons why students change teachers. In this mobile society, it is frequently because the student or teacher has moved to another loca tion. But changes can also occur for professional reasons- poor communication between the triangle of teacher/student/parent, lack of interest, a particular need that is not being fulfilled -&nb...
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What is Appropriate at the Early Level for the Gifted Child? Do You Use a Method Book?

I can hear that sigh when some of you read this question. One long-suffering teacher said, "Gifted child? In my studio a student is 'gifted' if the weekly assignment has been practiced!!" Or, as another teacher proudly told me, "I have a gifted student- he can play ALL of the scales." After determining that the student was fourteen years old a...
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Independence Day: Music Reading

Where Should Reading Come in the Beginner's Curriculum? by Richard Chronister  The best way to teach piano students to read will probably always be a hotly debated item, and we will continue to explore that subject in this department of KEYBOARD COMPANION. Another controversial subject in this area is the one we deal with in this issue — when ...
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About Piano Magazine

Piano Magazine is the leading resource for pianists, piano teachers, and piano enthusiasts. We bring you informative, interesting, and inspiring ideas on all aspects of piano teaching, learning, and performing. The official name of Clavier Companion magazine was changed to Piano Magazine in 2019.

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